Capitol Lakes, a continuing care retirement community (CCRC) in downtown Madison, WI, is now using the world’s only virtual rehabilitation system specifically designed for seniors and people with limited physical abilities. Capitol Lakes is proud to be 1 of the first retirement communities in the U.S. to implement the new OmniVR™ Virtual Rehabilitation System in its Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation Center.


It is also the very first in Wisconsin to use this technology.


Developed by Accelerated Care Plus (ACP), a Reno-based rehabilitation technology and education company, the OmniVR Virtual Rehabilitation System is unique in the industry. The Nintendo® Wii™ and Wii Fit™ have been used to help people improve balance and range-of-motion; however, these products are targeted to higher functioning individuals and often are not appropriate for seniors.


OmniVR is the only virtual solution that provides an opportunity for seniors and people with limited physical capabilities to participate in the benefits of virtual rehabilitation.


“Through visual feedback and a fun exercise program, the residents and locals we serve in our Skilled Nursing and Rehab Center gain skill and confidence and return to their homes more quickly,” says Josh Knops, a Capitol Lakes physical therapist. 


The OmniVR system implemented by Capitol Lakes offers six different rehabilitation programs appropriate for the entire spectrum of aging adults, from very frail to independent.


The gaming system includes an innovative, three-dimensional camera that captures the resident’s image and places it in a virtual exercise environment. The resident and therapist view the progress on a large color monitor. By exercising in a game-like environment, patients are more likely to exercise harder and longer.


On multiple occasions, people that had previously lost interest in improving their health have found a renewed interest, hope, and inspiration through the OmniVR system. Results are faster and more significant, partly due to the sense of camaraderie and competition fostered while playing the games.


Residents forget that they are participating in rigorous physical therapy, and tend to enjoy the activities daily without losing interest.

 

Providence Life Services does not focus on calculating a return on investment for technology and instead relies on technol­ogy-enabled services to help make the organization more efficient and specifically looks for areas to eliminate any duplicate data entry by integrating as many existing systems as possible. However, it recognizes that the existence of an EMR or other technology does not guarantee greater efficiency unless the organization uses the EMR implementa­tion period to standardize their procedures and processes. 

 

Providence Life Services does not focus on calculating a return on investment for technology and instead relies on technol­ogy-enabled services to help make the organization more efficient and specifically looks for areas to eliminate any duplicate data entry by integrating as many existing systems as possible. However, it recognizes that the existence of an EMR or other technology does not guarantee greater efficiency unless the organization uses the EMR implementa­tion period to standardize their procedures and processes. 

 

Use of Health Information Technology in Home Health and Hospice Agencies
Author: Helaine Resnick and Majd Alwan
Publication Date: September 2010

This report provides estimates on use of electronic medical records (EMR) in US home health and hospice (HHH) agencies, describes utilization of EMR functionalities, and presents novel data on telemedicine and point of care documentation (PoCD) in this setting. The report uses nationally representative, cross-sectional survey data from US HHH agencies from 2007. Data on agency characteristics, current use of EMR systems as well as use of telemedicine and PoCD were collected. In 2007, 43% of US HHH agencies reported use of an EMR system. 


Patient demographics and clinical notes were the most commonly used EMR functions among US HHH agencies. Between 2000 and 2007, there was a 33% increase in use of EMR among HHH agencies in the US, and use of EMR and PoCD technologies in non-profit agencies was significantly higher than for-profit ones. Finally, HHH agencies generally tended to use available EMR functionalities, including health information sharing. 


Use of Electronic Information Systems in Nursing Homes
Author: Helaine Resnick, Barbara Manard, Robyn Stone and Majd Alwan
Publication Date: March/April 2009

This study defines the extent of utilization of 12 types of electronic information system (EIS) function in U.S. nursing homes (NH), to relate EIS utilization to selected facility characteristics and to contrast these findings to previous estimates of EIS use in NH. The study used data from the National Nursing Home Survey (NNHS), a nationally representative, cross sectional sample of U.S. NH. Data Essentially all (99.6%) U.S. NH had >1 EIS, a figure that was driven by the nearly universal use of EIS for Minimum Data Set (MDS) reporting (96.4%) and for billing (95.4%). Nearly 43% of U.S. NH had EIS for medical records, including nurse’s notes, physician notes, and MDS forms.


EIS use ranged from a high of 79.6% for admission, transfer, and discharge to a low of 17.6% for daily care by certified nursing assistants (CNAs). Ownership, membership in a chain, and bed size were associated with use of selected EIS. Larger facilities and those that were part of a chain used more EIS than smaller standalone facilities. In 2004, NH use of EIS for functions other than MDS and billing was highly variable, but considerably higher than previous estimates. 

In furtherance of requirements under Section 13411 of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act to provide for periodic Health Insurance and Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) privacy and security compliance audits, the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced a pilot program whereby OCR will conduct up to 150 audits of covered entities and business associates to assess compliance with HIPAA privacy and security requirements.  Audits pursuant to the pilot program will commence in November of 2011 and conclude by December of 2012.


According to OCR, all covered entities under HIPAA—health care providers that engage in a covered transaction, health plans and healthcare clearinghouses—are eligible to be audited. OCR intends to audit as wide a range of types and sizes of covered entities as possible within the overall limit of 150 audits. LeadingAge members that meet the definition of a covered entity because they engage in transactions described by the administrative simplification provisions of HIPAA—generally those pertaining to insurance and government program billing—may be selected for the audit program.


Audits conducted pursuant to the program will involve a review of HIPAA privacy and security rule compliance documentation, on-site interviews with key personnel and observation of processes and operations to help determine compliance.   


Following the site visit, auditors will prepare and share with the covered entity a draft report of their findings. The covered entity will have the opportunity to discuss concerns and describe corrective action implemented to correct any identified concerns. A final report then will be prepared and submitted to OCR.


Additional details of the pilot program areavailable from OCR.

 

Annual Meeting  

  • One 10’X10’ complimentary exhibit booth including registration.
  • Early selection of expo space for next year (select after LeadingAge Partners and Premier Sponsors).
  • Recognition on Annual Meeting website.
  • Recognition on "You Are Here" Expo website.
  • Recognition on special page in promotion brochure.
  • Recognition on special page in Pre-Convention Planner.
  • 30% discount on full-page advertisement in Pre-Convention Planner.
  • Recognition in attendee pre-conference e-newsletter.

(i.e., HCBS Elderly
and/or Physically Disabled Adult Waivers) 

SC- Choice (for elderly/disabled individuals

Types of Technology Reimbursed/Definition (i.e., Personal Emergency Response System (PERS), Medication Dispensing,
Home Telehealth, Remote Monitoring, etc.)
 

Durable
Medical Equipment (Includes PERS):
  Provides equipment and supplies
that give therapeutic benefits, life-sustaining nutrition, or allow a person to
perform certain tasks that they couldn't because of a medical condition.
Durable medical equipment is medical equipment that can withstand repeated use
and is suitable for use in the home. 

Reimbursement Rates  

DME/PERS Service: $36.00/month 

DME/PERS Installation: $36.00 one-time 

Telemonitoring
Service (Home Telehealth):
The Telemonitoring service is available to Community Choices participants
to maintain and promote their health status through medical telemonitoring of
body weight, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, blood glucose levels, and basic
heart rate information.  

The objectives of the Telemonitoring service are to maintain and promote
the health status of Medicaid home and community-based waiver participants
through medical telemonitoring of body weight, blood pressure, oxygen
saturation, blood glucose levels, and basic heart rate information. 

Conditions
of Participation - Providers
 

Providers must have equipment that records at a minimum the participant’s
body weight, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, blood glucose levels, and basic
heart rate information. All agencies must also have nursing personnel and
health care professionals able to carry out the duties of the service described
below. 

Providers must agree to participate in all components of the Care Call
monitoring and payment system and have the capability to receive and respond to
authorizations for service in an electronic format. 

Providers must have at least one (1) year of experience or otherwise
demonstrate competency in the provision of this service. 

Conditions
of Participation – Community Choices Waiver Participants
 

Community Choices waiver participants must meet the following criteria in
order to be considered for the telemonitoring service: 

Have a primary diagnosis of Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus,
Hypertension, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, and/or Congestive Heart
Failure; and 

Have a history of at least two hospitalizations and/or emergency room
visits in the past 12 months; and 

Have a primary care physician that approves the use of the telemonitoring
service and is solely responsible for receiving and acting upon the information
received via the telemonitoring service; and  

Be capable of using the telemonitoring equipment and transmitting the
necessary data or have an individual available to them that is capable of
utilizing the telemonitoring equipment and transmitting data to the
telemonitoring provider. 

At a minimum, CLTC shall perform a re-assessment of the telemonitoring
service need at re-evaluation of level of care. The re-assessment by CLTC shall
be done to assess whether or not any of the above conditions have changed and
to assess the continuing need for the service. 

Reimbursement Rates  

Telemonitoring: $10/day (no maximum number of days per year) 

South
Carolina Reimbursement Policy Notes:
South Carolina’s
telemonitoring service started as a reimbursed SC Choice waiver service in
February 2009.  Currently there are 99
open authorizations for the service. The decision was made to institute the
service by executive staff at SCDHHS with the goal of reducing hospital and
emergency room visits. 

LeadingAge member Crest View Senior Communities in Columbia Heights, Minn., recognizes the value of technology, however, investing in new technology can be a low priority for nursing homes. After completing and submitting a lengthy application, Crest View received a no-interest loan from the state. The funds will be used for point-of-care software and hardware to reduce errors in the capture of ADL information.

Aging Services of California and the California Association for Health Services at Home joined together to develop AgeTech West, a joint effort to assist providers implement proven, cost-effective technologies that will increase the efficiency of care and the quality of life for clients receiving care.
 

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