Innovative Ways to Expand Access and ROI

Center Post

Presbyterian SeniorCare is preparing to extend its services into the homes of older people living in the community. Preliminary plans call for integrating a variety of technology devices into the organization’s non-medical home care agency and into an adult day health program that the organization is now expanding. A shared transportation service would link these two programs with the organization’s Longwood at Home program.

This is the 18th in a series of case studies from the Preparing for the Future report.

You can check out the full Presbyterian SeniorCare’s case study or continue reading the summary below.

The Organization

Founded in 1928, Presbyterian SeniorCare (PSC) is the largest provider of care and services to older adults in southwestern Pennsylvania. 

Its world-renowned Woodside Place offers care for people with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias while its SeniorCare Network affiliate manages or owns more than 45 affordable apartment communities in nine counties. 

SeniorCare at Home provides non-medical, private-duty care that focuses on in-home assistance with activities of daily living.

The Approach

PSC is preparing to extend its services into the homes of older people living in the community. Preliminary plans call for integrating a variety of technology devices into the organization’s non-medical home care agency and into an adult day health program that the organization is now expanding.

Technology

PSC hopes to expand its use of technology by deploying non-medical technology solutions through its private-duty home care agency, expanding the scope of its adult day health program by equipping client homes with remote monitoring technology systems and using in-home technology as a tool to better integrate its HCBS services into the process of nursing home discharges to a Medicare Home Health Agency (HHA) and long-term HCBS services.

Business Case

PSC is exploring a variety of remote monitoring systems and various personal emergency response systems, medication management systems, fall detectors and GPS locators. No single company has the exact solution to meet the needs of PSC clients. Additionally, the organization has had difficulty calculating a return on investment (ROI) for these technologies.

PSC does not perceive much value-add to the organization with a remote monitoring business model in which third-party vendors install remote monitoring systems, perform “backroom” monitoring and data collection functions, and collect the fees that consumers pay for the service. It is difficult to calculate a hard ROI to PSC as a pass-through referral source. 

The organization is exploring several alternative strategies that could help it make a business case for remote monitoring.

You can also view all 18 case studies from the Preparing for the Future report.