Contact: Lisa Sanders/LeadingAge
lsanders@leadingage.org; 202-508-9407
Contact: AHCAPressOffice@ahca.org
202-898-2814


February 15, 2019 Washington D.C. -- LeadingAge and the American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living applaud today’s introduction of the bi-partisan Nursing Home Workforce Quality Act. Leaders of both organizations, which combined represent the majority of America’s skilled nursing and long-term care providers, praise Rep. Sean Duffy (R-WI) and Collin Peterson (D-MN) for their leadership on a long-overdue initiative that will support nursing homes’ efforts to train staff and provide the highest quality of care to older adults.


The legislation introduced today modifies the Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) training lock-out mandated by the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987 (OBRA). It eliminates the statute’s rigid provisions and grants CMS greater flexibility in reinstating providers’ valuable CNA training programs.


“Nursing homes and other long-term care providers are grappling with a severe workforce shortage. The ability to train CNAs is crucial to building and maintaining a pipeline of qualified staff,” said LeadingAge president and CEO Katie Smith Sloan. “We have advocated for this change to OBRA for many years. The introduction of this bill is a monumental step forward in our ongoing efforts to address the challenges providers face in recruiting and retaining workers.”


Under current law, nursing homes assessed civil monetary penalties above a certain level on their annual survey automatically lose their authority to train staff to be CNAs for two years. The suspension is required even if the fines are unrelated to the quality of care given to residents or if the care deficiencies cited on the survey are unrelated to the nursing home’s CNA training program. CNAs, who provide direct care to residents, are critical members of every nursing home’s care team.


“Effectively eliminating training programs for vital front-line staff threatens the quality of care we provide, particularly as the shortage of health care workers becomes more acute,” said Mark Parkinson, president and CEO of the American Health Care Association/National Center for Assisted Living. “CNAs are the backbone of quality care and the jobs that nursing homes and assisted living communities provide are often integral to the community, particularly in rural and small communities where they are the major employer in the area. This bill will help everyone be more responsive to the needs of residents and providers.”


Both LeadingAge and AHCA/NCAL appreciate the leadership Reps. Duffy and Peterson have shown on this issue, and urge their House colleagues to join them in cosponsoring this important legislation.


About LeadingAge


The mission of LeadingAge is to be the trusted voice of aging. Our 6,000+ members and partners include nonprofit organizations representing the entire field of aging services, 38 state associations, hundreds of businesses, consumer groups, foundations and research centers. LeadingAge is also part of the Global Ageing Network, whose membership spans 30 countries. LeadingAge is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt charitable organization focused on education, advocacy and applied research.


About AHCA/NCAL


The American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living (AHCA/NCAL) represents more than 13,500 nonprofit and proprietary skilled nursing centers, assisted living communities, sub-acute care centers and homes for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. By delivering solutions for quality care, AHCA/NCAL aims to improve the lives of frail, elderly and individuals with disabilities who receive long term or post-acute care in our member facilities each day. For more information, please visit www.ahca.org or www.ncal.org.

Intro: 

Leading Industry Groups Support Legislation to End Mandatory CNA Training Lock-Outs

News Type: 
Provider Type (If Any): 
Nursing Home Quality
Nursing Home Rules and Regulation
Nursing Homes
Author: 
Lisa Sanders
Members Only: 

We are glad Congress and the President have reached agreement on a measure to end the partial shutdown and reopen affected federal agencies for three weeks. It is good news, of course, for so many people across the country, said LeadingAge president and CEO Katie Smith Sloan. 

For LeadingAge members who provide government subsidized, affordable housing for low-income older adults -- providers like Alma Ballard, executive director of the Family Housing Management Co. – this is particularly welcome relief.

Ms. Ballard is one of many among our members who because of the shutdown had to tap reserves after HUD said it would not renew contracts expiring in December.

That raised concerns for Diana Siarto, a 70-year old former waitress and retired Las Vegas pit boss who lives in an apartment operated by Family Housing Management. As The Washington Post reported, she, and thousands of other low income older adults around the country, depend on the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)-funded programs: “We’ve worked all our lives. We’re all low-income. We have no place else to go. We’re literally out on the streets if these places shut down.”

LeadingAge is concerned that the comfort brought by this interim deal to reopen the government may not be long lasting. Remember that about a month ago, when the possibility of another continuing resolution loomed large, HUD said then that the FY18 funding levels would not be sufficient to sustain 202/PRAC renewal costs, which rose significantly between FY18 and FY19, through January 2019.

A continuing resolution (CR) would provide only the amount of funding for 2019 that housing programs received last year; last year’s spending levels would not cover this year’s increased costs.

Our position: this has to be the last CR.

We urge HUD to get expired contracts renewed as soon as furloughed employees return to their desks, and ensure that those contracts due to expire in February 2019 are renewed before the 15th.

And, Congress: before the current three-week spending measure expires, pass a HUD spending bill covering the rest of this fiscal year in order to restore stability to programs that house older people who have no other resources.

Intro: 

While end of longest-ever federal government shutdown brings relief, LeadingAge's concerns and commitment to our funding objectives remain 

News Type: 
News Areas: 
Provider Type (If Any): 
HUD
Preservation
Senior Housing
Author: 
Lisa Sanders
Members Only: 

Contact: Lisa Sanders/LeadingAge

lsanders@leadingage.org; 202-508-9407

Contact: Katy Corey/TimeSlips

katy@filamentwi.com; 414-931-1269

January 15, 2019 Washington D.C. -- LeadingAge, the association of nonprofit providers of aging services, today announces a partnership with nonprofit TimeSlips, an international network of caregivers and artists committed to bringing meaningful engagement to older adults, people living with dementia, and those who care for them.

The collaboration enables TimeSlips with funds and expertise to expand its curriculum and audience. Over the next two years, TimeSlips will formalize and disseminate training programs for high-school and college students, with the goal of building the next generation of users. LeadingAge will invest $189,000 from the LeadingAge Innovation Fund over 2 years as well as serve as an advisor to TimeSlips in program development and execution.

“Our involvement with TimeSlips touches 3 of our core focus areas: workforce development, raising awareness of dementia and caregiving, and challenging ageism,” said Katie Smith Sloan, president and CEO of LeadingAge. “As we look at solutions for the many challenges our members face, we strive to partner with innovative, forward-thinking organizations like TimeSlips. This effort aligns closely with our wish for all older adults: access to high-quality, person-centered care that acknowledges and celebrates the value and worth of people at all stages of aging. We can’t wait to get started.”

Founded in 1998 by Anne Basting, a 2016 MacArthur Fellow, Milwaukee, WI-based TimeSlips helps people connect through creativity with training and certification in person-directed caregiving for all people, and particularly for people living with dementia. To date, the organization has certified caregiver facilitators in 46 states and 17 countries. The LeadingAge collaboration is aimed at helping TimeSlips scale its programming to a reach a national student audience. At the partnership’s completion, TimeSlips aims to establish credit bearing programs at 10 high schools and colleges in the U.S., with a plan to roll out materials nationally.

“For so many students, TimeSlips is a joyful first exposure to working with elders, one that can help shed negative stereotypes,” said Ms. Bastings, TimeSlips CEO. “To partner with a visionary group like LeadingAge gives us a chance to watch countless lives and relationships bloom.”

The partnership is structured in 2 phases. In the first year, TimeSlips will create a stakeholder group comprised of executives, educators, and LeadingAge state partners and provider members. The nonprofit will also develop support materials, curriculum, and evaluation tools as well as test and evaluate programming at select campuses. The following year will focus on distribution and implementation of volunteer, student service learning, Student Artist-in-Residence and credit-bearing training programs at a minimum of 10 campuses, followed by an evaluation.

About LeadingAge

The mission of LeadingAge is to be the trusted voice for aging. Our 6,000+ members and partners include nonprofit organizations representing the entire field of aging services, 38 state associations, hundreds of businesses, consumer groups, foundations and research centers. LeadingAge is also a part of the Global Ageing Network, whose membership spans 30 countries. LeadingAge is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt charitable organization focused on education, advocacy and applied research.

About TimeSlips

TimesSlips is an award-winning, international nonprofit that brings meaning and purpose to late life by inspiring a dynamic of respect and wonder between older people and those who care for them. Founded by MacArthur “Genius” Fellow Anne Basting, TimeSlips provides inspiring tools and resources to spark creative engagement regardless of physical or cognitive disabilities. We work toward a moment when creative engagement is simply standard practice in our care relationships.

 
Intro: 

Agreement Will Aid TimeSlips' Expansion with LeadingAge as Advisor and Investor

News Type: 
Author: 
Lisa Sanders
Members Only: 

Launched a New Research Website


In December, the LeadingAge LTSS Center @UMass Boston unveiled its new website: www.LTSScenter.org. The new website represents an important milestone in the development of the LTSS Center, which was established in 2017 by LeadingAge and the Gerontology Institute at the University of Massachusetts Boston.


LTSScenter.org showcases the LTSS Center’s work while offering visitors a comprehensive repository of academic and applied research that bridges policy and practice in the field of aging. We hope you’ll visit LTSScenter.org often to read about the latest research in our field.


Celebrated Research Milestones


While reveling in the launch of its new website, the LTSS Center also celebrated 2018 as a year of many accomplishments, including the publication of significant research findings that:


Helped Prepare Members for the Government Shutdown


In late December, LeadingAge was looking out for housing members that would be affected by the looming government shutdown.


In advance of the shutdown, LeadingAge urged Congress to enact a final FY19 appropriations bill before expiration of the Continuing Resolution funding the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and several other federal agencies. At the same time, we kept LeadingAge housing members informed about how the shutdown, which began on Dec. 21, would affect HUD and its programs.


Commented on Important Issues


LeadingAge and its content experts lent their voices to several important issues in December:


Caregiver Benefits: LeadingAge responded to a request for comments on how to implement 2 changes to the Veterans Affairs (VA) Family Caregivers program. Those changes, which were authorized by the VA MISSION Act of 2018, include adding a new pathway to eligibility to veterans who may need services, and offering new benefits for eligible families.


Value-Based Payments: Nicole Fallon, vice president of health policy and integrated services, spoke to a number of media outlets after the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services took steps to reduce avoidable hospital readmissions of nursing home residents by lowering payments to nearly 11,000 nursing homes, and giving bonuses to nearly 4,000 others. "Skilled facilities have been working toward this and knew it was coming," Fallon told Kaiser Health News. She also expressed concerns that nursing homes could continue to be penalized even after they had done all they could to prevent return trips to the hospital. "At what point have we achieved all we can achieve?" Fallon asked.


Affordable Senior Housing: Linda Couch, vice president of housing policy, spoke to a number of media outlets after the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University released a report on affordable housing for low-income older adults. In December, Couch told Senior Housing News that she’d like to see a 50% increase in states’ Low Income Housing Tax Credit allocations, as well as changes that would allow subsidizing of lower income households than the program currently supports. “There has been legislation introduced we hope to move further along in the next Congress,” Couch said. Couch also discussed the Harvard report with McKnight’s Senior Living and Reuters.


Life Plan Communities: Steve Maag, director of residential communities, was quoted in a New York Times article exploring how baby boomers are creating a surge in luxury care communities. “Baby boomers are being a very demanding customer,” said Maag, adding that the senior living field must respond “to a consumer that has pushed back on everything they’ve touched in the last 60 years.”


Led the Fight Against Ageism


From Dec. 10 through Dec. 14, LeadingAge dedicated its social media platforms to educating Americans about ageism. The week-long #WhatIsAgeism campaign was designed to spark conversations that shared information and stories about ageism, raised awareness about how to spot and address ageism, and started discussions among family and friends about how ageism affects us all. The campaign’s results were impressive. For example, a total of 189 #WhatIsAgeism messages on Twitter had a potential reach of 166,000 Twitter users over the course of the week.


Launched New Education Programs


LeadingAge members engaged with our education team during 2 virtual programs presented through our Learning Hub in December.


A webinar on Dec. 12 explored the legal and operational challenges raised by the recreational and medical use of marijuana by residents and employees of LeadingAge member communities.


Our first Virtual Federal Update on Dec. 17 reviewed LeadingAge’s policy successes over the past year, the outlook for the new Congress, and policy areas of most concern to LeadingAge communities.


The education team also spent December preparing for its 2019 Leadership Educator Program, which will teach a small group of LeadingAge members how to design and deliver learning opportunities in settings that range from stand-up meetings and mentoring sessions to trainings, board retreats, and strategic planning forums. The Leadership Educator Program takes place May through August, both in-person and virtually. Applications are due Feb. 4.

Intro: 

Here’s an overview of our work for you in December 2018.

News Type: 
News Areas: 
News Topics: 
Provider Type (If Any): 
CFAR
Housing Plus Services
Life Plan Community (CCRC)
Nursing Home Payment and Finance
Nursing Homes
Senior Housing
Subsidized Housing
Author: 
Geralyn Magan
Members Only: 

LeadingAge Statement from president and CEO Katie Smith Sloan in response to "Sheltering in Danger," an investigative report by the Minority Staff of the U.S. Senate Committee on Finance," Nov. 2, 2018.

We appreciate that the Finance Committee is interested in ensuring that nursing home residents are safe and receive high-quality care. Our members, nonprofit providers of aging services, including skilled nursing, share these concerns and live them every day.

As we said in written testimony to the Committee in September, the deaths at Hollywood Hills should never have happened. Had outside witnesses been invited to testify in early September, LeadingAge would have pointed out that the new CMS emergency preparedness rules outline very detailed specifications for emergency plans that address all potential hazards.

First, let’s be clear. We make no apology for poor quality nursing home care. Errors should be addressed. Continual improvement is a must. That’s why LeadingAge has supported the substantial changes, put into place in late 2017 as part of CMS’ new regulations, months after the Florida and Texas events described in this Nov. 2018 “Sheltering in Danger,” report.

Regarding the Committee’s recommendations, we propose that, prior to adding more regulations -- and risk complicating the decision process administrators and nursing home staff follow when assessing whether to stay or go -- the Committee members speak to administrators and staff whose deep experience in managing disaster situations has yielded success. As the report introduction notes, ‘most of the facilities weathered [hurricane Harvey and Irma] without incident…’

We believe that while clear requirements are essential, room must be allowed for human judgment in emergency and disaster situations.

Nobody entrusted with making the decision to evacuate or shelter in place takes it lightly. As we’ve seen, lives depend on leaders making the right decision - and learning from what happened before. Fortunately, emergency plans and generators were in place to deal effectively with Hurricanes Florence and Michael, both of which occurred after the new rules went into effect.

Let’s give the new system a chance to work. Further, we suggest that all community partners be part of the solution. For example, nursing homes should be as high as hospitals on the priority list for restoration of power.

In the spirit of continual improvement, we encourage the Committee to adopt a ‘learn-from-the-best’ mentality. Improve training and preparation, as suggested, and develop a better-informed, receptive and responsive community emergency response system. Draw from the examples of experienced operators, including those who during the recent Hurricane Florence and Michael disasters, demonstrated their ability to properly assess options and manage the situation while working within existing guidelines. (See NPR.org: “How Nursing Homes are Preparing for Hurricane Florence,” Sept. 11, 2018, and NBCNews.com: “Evacuate or Stay? For Nursing Homes in Storm’s Path, the Decision isn’t Easy,” Sept. 12, 2018)

We would welcome the opportunity to convene providers, CMS, consumers and other stakeholders to meet with the Committee staff to discuss emergency and disaster planning and the experiences of our members with planning and with the new requirements. If the Committee determines that additional requirements are necessary, we respectfully suggest committing new resources to support implementation and evaluate impact.

Finally, all of the nearly 6,000 provider communities that belong to LeadingAge care deeply about supporting each other when disaster strikes. We established the LeadingAge Disaster Relief Fund in 2017. Last year, thanks to more than 1,000 donations from member organizations and people around the country, we raised more than $680,000 to help those affected by hurricanes, mudslides, and wildfires. This year members contributed nearly $20,000 to help those affected by Hurricane Florence. All Funds go directly to those in need for basics like food and water.

###

 

News Type: 
Provider Type (If Any): 
Nursing Home Quality
Nursing Home Rules and Regulation
Nursing Homes
Author: 
Lisa Sanders
Members Only: 

Contact: Lisa Sanders

lsanders@leadingage.org

202-508-9407

Washington D.C. October 18, 2018 -- Falls are costly for older adults. The good news: an increasing number of technology companies are responding to the need for help with fall detection and prevention through monitoring using safety technologies and devices.

Safety technology options extend beyond fall detection and prevention, however.

That’s why LeadingAge Center for Aging Services Technologies (CAST) today introduces its first-ever toolkit devoted to safety technology for use in long-term and post-acute care environments. The five-part resource educates providers of aging services and LeadingAge members on the breadth of available devices, applications and services available to help improve safety, sense of security, peace of mind and quality of life and care for older adults and their caregivers.

“Falls are the leading cause of fatal and nonfatal injuries for older Americans. Research shows that those who receive help within one hour of a fall are nearly six times more likely to survive than those who wait longer for aid,” said Majd Alwan, PhD, Executive Director of CAST. “Tech devices to either prevent falls or summon help after a fall, as well as check-in systems and community-wide communication systems, improve older adults’ safety and the quality of their care in many ways, whether the older adults live independently or in a community. Our toolkit helps providers and consumers with the identification, planning for and selection of the best products and services to meet users’ needs.”

Available online at no cost, the toolkit includes: a whitepaper, an interactive guide, an online product selection tool and a product selection matrix, both comparing 34 products from 18 vendors, and case studies from providers utilizing safety technology.

An additional resource in the toolkit whitepaper is a section for providers on Medicaid waiver coverage of safety technologies, as well as a discussion of other potential opportunities to incorporate these technologies into business and care delivery models, their return-on-investment (ROI) and how to calculate such ROI.

About the LeadingAge Center for Aging Services Technologies
The LeadingAge Center for Aging Services Technologies (CAST) is focused on accelerating the development, evaluation and adoption of emerging technologies that will transform the aging experience. An international coalition of more than 400 technology companies, aging-services organizations, businesses, research universities, and government representatives, CAST works under the auspices of LeadingAge, an association of 6,000+ members and partners that include nonprofit organizations representing the entire field of aging services, 38 state partners, hundreds of businesses, consumer groups, foundations, and research partners.

Intro: 

Devices and Systems Help Prevent Leading Cause of Fatal and Non-Fatal Injuries for Older Adults

News Type: 
News Areas: 
Provider Type (If Any): 
CAST
Author: 
Lisa Sanders
Members Only: 

Contact: Lisa Sanders
lsanders@leadingage.org
202-508-9407

Washington D.C. October 9, 2018 -- Coming into its 15th year, the premier health information technology conference dedicated to uniting executives and IT leaders in the long-term and post-acute care field with acute care providers, payers and technology vendors in aging services, announces exciting developments for its June 2019 conference.

The most obvious change is the new name. The Long-Term Post-Acute Care Health IT Summit is now the Collaborative Care & Health IT Innovations Summit, to better reflect the breadth of providers and key business partners involved, including payers, technology partners, and information exchange facilitators, said Majd Alwan, SVP Technology and Executive Director, LeadingAge Center for Aging Services Technology (CAST), the Summit’s lead planner.

For the 2019 event, to be held in Baltimore, Maryland, June 23-25, CAST welcomes collaborators including LeadingAge and members of the Long-Term Post-Acute Care Health IT Collaborative; together, the group will deliver a unique experience for attendees -- health IT leaders, strategists, policymakers, providers, clinicians, vendors and professionals -- promoting a discussion of technology’s role as a connector integrating pre-acute and long-term post-acute care services into the healthcare and payment ecosystems, and uniting formerly silo’d sectors in an era of health and payment reforms.

“What residents, patients, clients or caregivers want and need must drive the integrated delivery of care, with a person-centered focus. Technology can help make this happen. Last June’s conference reinforced our belief in the importance of collaboration across the entire healthcare ecosystem in order to meet that demand,” said Majd Alwan, SVP Technology and Executive Director, LeadingAge Center for Aging Services Technology. “We’re expanding on last year’s themes to explore more connectivity and interoperability modalities and their impact on care and payment models. Most of all, the focus on innovative business models that incentivize all parties -- including long-term post-acute care providers -- must also continue.”

Finally, to facilitate engaging technology vendors’ participation in the Summit, the exhibitors’ application process now requires an application prior to registration.

Check the new Summit’s web site, last year’s schedule of events and sponsors & exhibitors, and what went down in 2018. Businesses, including health information exchange facilitators and intermediaries, interested in exhibiting, can find more details on doing so here.

Speakers interested in participating in the 2019 Collaborative Care & Health IT Summit, please contact Scott Code, Associate Director of CAST, at scode@leadingage.org. 202-508-9466.

About the LTPAC Health IT Collaborative

The LTPAC Health IT Collaborative is a public-private group of stakeholder organizations representing associations, providers, policy-makers, researchers, vendors, and professionals with a mission to coordinate the sector and maintain alignment with the national priorities. The Collaborative was formed in 2005 to advance health information technology (health IT) issues by encouraging coordination among provider organizations, policymakers, vendors, payers and other stakeholders. Collaborative members include national associations representing clinicians, providers, information technology developers and researchers with expertise in the long term and post-acute care (LTPAC).

About the LeadingAge Center for Aging Services Technologies
The LeadingAge Center for Aging Services Technologies (CAST) is focused on accelerating the development, evaluation and adoption of emerging technologies that will transform the aging experience. An international coalition of more than 400 technology companies, aging-services organizations, businesses, research universities and government representatives, CAST works under the auspices of LeadingAge, an association of 6,000+ members and partners that include nonprofit organizatinos representing the entire field of aging services, 38 state partners, hundreds of businesses, consumer groups, foundation and research partners.

Intro: 

New Name Reflects Conference’s Role in Aligning LTPAC Sector with Acute Care and Payers

News Type: 
News Areas: 
Provider Type (If Any): 
CAST
Author: 
Lisa Sanders
Members Only: 

Contact: Lisa Sanders/LeadingAge
lsanders@leadingage.org; 202-508-9407
Contact: AHCAPressOffice@ahca.org
202-898-2814

September 28, 2018 Washington D.C. -- LeadingAge and the American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living applaud today’s introduction of H.R. 6986, the Nursing Home Workforce Quality Act. Leaders of both organizations, which combined represent the majority of America’s skilled nursing and long-term care providers, praise Rep. Sean Duffy (R-WI) for his leadership on a long-overdue initiative that will support nursing homes’ efforts to train staff and provide the highest quality of care to older adults.

The legislation introduced today modifies the Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) training lock-out mandated by the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987 (OBRA). It eliminates the statute’s rigid provisions and grants CMS greater flexibility in reinstating providers’ valuable CNA training programs.

“Nursing homes and other long-term care providers are grappling with a severe workforce shortage. The ability to train CNAs is crucial to building and maintaining a pipeline of qualified staff,” said LeadingAge president and CEO Katie Smith Sloan. “We have advocated for this change to OBRA for many years. The introduction of this bill is a monumental step forward in our ongoing efforts to address the challenges providers face in recruiting and retaining workers.”

Under OBRA, nursing homes assessed civil monetary penalties above a certain level on their annual survey automatically lose their authority to train CNAs for two years. The suspension is required even if the fines are unrelated to the quality of care given to residents or if the care deficiencies cited on the survey are unrelated to the nursing home’s CNA training program. Additionally, training cannot be reinstated before the two-year period ends even if a provider fixes the problem for which it is fined. CNAs, who provide direct care to residents, are critical members of every nursing home’s care team.

“Effectively eliminating training programs for vital front-line staff threatens the quality of care we provide, particularly as the shortage of health care workers becomes more acute,” said Mark Parkinson, president and CEO of the American Health Care Association/National Center for Assisted Living. “CNAs are the backbone of quality care and the jobs that nursing homes and assisted living communities provide are often integral to the community, particularly in rural and small communities where they are the major employer in the area. This bill will help everyone be more responsive to the needs of residents and providers.”

Both LeadingAge and AHCA/NCAL appreciate the leadership Rep. Duffy has shown on this issue, and urge his House colleagues to join him in cosponsoring this important legislation.

About LeadingAge

The mission of LeadingAge is to be the trusted voice of aging. Our 6,000+ members and partners include nonprofit organizations representing the entire field of aging services, 38 state associations, hundreds of businesses, consumer groups, foundations and research centers. LeadingAge is also part of the Global Ageing Network, whose membership spans 30 countries. LeadingAge is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt charitable organization focused on education, advocacy and applied research.

About AHCA/NCAL

The American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living (AHCA/NCAL) represents more than 13,500 nonprofit and proprietary skilled nursing centers, assisted living communities, sub-acute care centers and homes for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. By delivering solutions for quality care, AHCA/NCAL aims to improve the lives of frail, elderly and individuals with disabilities who receive long term or post-acute care in our member facilities each day. For more information, please visit www.ahca.org or www.ncal.org.

 
Intro: 

Leading Industry Groups Support H.R. 6986 Legislation to End Mandatory CNA Training Lock-Out

News Type: 
Provider Type (If Any): 
Nursing Homes
Author: 
Lisa Sanders
Members Only: 

Contact: Lisa Sanders

lsanders@leadingage.org

347-385-2218 cell

Washington D.C. March 23, 2018 -- LeadingAge, the association for nonprofit providers of aging services, celebrates Congress’ support for the expansion and preservation of affordable housing for low-income older adults. The inclusion of funding for new, affordable senior housing coupled with the inclusion of a new housing preservation tool, known as RAD for PRAC, in the fiscal year 2018 omnibus spending bill, are significant advocacy wins for LeadingAge and its members.

“This victory caps years of focused, persistent, and heartfelt advocacy,” said Katie Smith Sloan, president and CEO of LeadingAge. “It would not have been possible without the support and effort by many of our members.”

As part of the omnibus, expected to be signed into law this week, Congress would expand HUD’s Rental Assistance Demonstration (RAD) to include Section 202 Housing for the Elderly homes in need of capital investment. The new authority provides over 2,800 Section 202 nonprofit-sponsored communities nationwide, all serving Americans age 62 and older, with the ability to seek out private financing to meet capital repair needs in order to preserve this affordable housing well into the future. In addition, the spending bill includes some of the highest funding levels provided to most housing programs in recent years, including $105 million for more than 760 new affordable homes for low-income older Americans.

“Given the extreme shortage of housing affordable to low-income seniors, the inclusion of new construction funding and the new preservation tool in the omnibus are important steps forward for LeadingAge’s members,” said Linda Couch, vice president of housing policy. “The average income of seniors assisted by the Section 202 program is $13,300; we must preserve and expand this critical housing.”

LeadingAge members around the U.S. share Ms. Couch’s enthusiasm for lawmakers’ support. “This much-needed statutory change will allow us to upgrade and renovate the homes of thousands of our seniors nationwide,” said Patrick Sheridan, executive vice president, housing, Volunteers of America.

For New York City-based Selfhelp Community Services, “This policy will enable us to finance critical upgrades, including new roofs, new heating and cooling systems, and façade work. Combined with our social service model, this will enable older adults to age with the independence and dignity they deserve, in housing that best meets their needs,” said Evelyn Wolff, vice president, Real Estate Development.

“We have a forecasted capital needs gap of approximately $45 million over the next decade. This will help us to address our communities’ needs, and to safely and affordably house some of our country’s most vulnerable elders for many years to come,” said Michelle Norris, executive vice president of external affairs and strategic initiatives, National Church Residences.

LeadingAge is grateful to the Senate’s inclusion of RAD for PRAC authority in its FY18 HUD bill, and for Representative Mike Quigley’s (D-IL) championing of this new authority during the House’s consideration of its FY18 HUD spending bill.

About LeadingAge

The mission of LeadingAge is to be the trusted voice for aging. Our 6,000+ members and partners include nonprofit organizations representing the entire field of aging services, 38 state associations, hundreds of businesses, consumer groups, foundations and research centers. LeadingAge is also a part of the Global Ageing Network, whose membership spans 30 countries. LeadingAge is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt charitable organization focused on education, advocacy and applied research.

Intro: 

Inclusion of More Funding and New Tools to Provide Access to Additional Financing Resources in Omnibus Legislation Achieves Longstanding Advocacy Goal for Association’s Nonprofit Affordable Housing Members

News Type: 
Provider Type (If Any): 
Housing Finance
HUD
Senior Housing
Author: 
Lisa Sanders
Members Only: 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Lisa Sanders

347-385-2218 cell; lsanders@leadingage.org

Washington D.C. March 23, 2018--LeadingAge, the association for nonprofit providers of aging services, commends Congress’ passage of the omnibus 2018 spending bill yesterday. The legislation currently awaits approval from President Trump.

“We are especially pleased that Congress recognized the need to make much-needed renovations to aging housing properties,” said Katie Smith Sloan, president and CEO.

The bill includes RAD for PRAC, a provision for which LeadingAge and our members have worked very hard for many years. RAD for PRAC is shorthand for provisions that will give housing properties with project rental assistance contracts access to the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Rental Assistance Demonstration program. This provision will bring new preservation opportunities to aging project rental assistance contract communities and is a key priority for LeadingAge. We commend Congress for including this provision in the spending bill and congratulate the many LeadingAge members who joined us in advocating for it.

The omnibus spending bill provides some of the highest funding levels most housing programs have seen in years, including $105 million for more than 760 new affordable homes for low-income older adults.

We also are pleased that low-income home energy assistance (LIHEAP), social services block grants, and other programs on which older people rely for home and community-based services received increased funding. In addition, the omnibus spending bill provides $4.5 million in health promotion dedicated to Alzheimer’s disease and $2 million for initiatives to prevent falls among older people. Research funding on Alzheimer’s disease also received a $414 million boost.

Because Medicare and Medicaid are not subject to the annual appropriations process, this legislation does not affect the funding of those programs, although Congress included language encouraging CMS to support mental health treatment for older individuals, especially in rural and underserved areas, noting that Medicare does not cover such care completely.

“We applaud Congress for the funding they approved for essential services for older adults through the remainder of 2018, and we will continue working with legislators on the budget for fiscal year 2019,” Sloan added.

About LeadingAge

The mission of LeadingAge is to be the trusted voice for aging. Our 6,000+ members and partners include nonprofit organizations representing the entire field of aging services, 38 state associations, hundreds of businesses, consumer groups, foundations and research centers. LeadingAge is also a part of the Global Ageing Network, whose membership spans 30 countries. LeadingAge is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt charitable organization focused on education, advocacy and applied research.

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Intro: 

Legislation marks a huge win for LeadingAge and its members’ advocacy, especially on affordable senior housing.

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Lisa Sanders
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