Contact: Lisa Sanders lsanders@leadingage.org 202-508-9407


Alan King aking@gu.org 202-777-0116


May 6, 2019, Washington DC — Whether it is a healthy cooking class, a 30-minute technology tutoring session, or a weekly “Learn to Knit” club, high-quality social activities that bring older adults and young people together in purposeful activities can have a powerful, positive impact on both seniors and youth. Benefits of participation in well-designed intergenerational programs and fostering cross-age relationships, research shows, include a decrease in social isolation among older adults and increased feelings of belonging, self-esteem and well-being. For young people, intergenerational experiences can help to improve behavior and academic performance, and increase self-esteem and empathy.


To promote the development and implementation of intergenerational programs, LeadingAge LTSS Center @UMass Boston in collaboration with Generations United, today releases the “Connecting Generations in Senior Housing: A Program Implementation Toolkit.


This new 82-page toolkit provides step-by-step guidance for creating intergenerational programs that can be tailored to the needs of youth and older adult participants. Building on findings of an earlier report, “From Promise to Practice: Intergenerational Programming in Senior Housing,” and research snapshot the toolkit contains provides practical information and templates to help housing providers and leaders at other organizations to plan, develop, implement, evaluate and sustain intergenerational programs. All the work is funded by grants from the Retirement Research Foundation.


“Senior housing can be an ideal setting to test and build these valuable programs,” said Dr. Taryn Patterson, policy research associate, LeadingAge LTSSCenter@UMass Boston, who partnered with Generations United on the project. “In collaboration with LeadingAge members, we’ve developed an easy-to-use resources based on real-life experiences of providers and residents. Our goal is to ensure that intergenerational programming becomes a part of every housing community in the country, and that housing professionals are able to build a network for sharing experiences as well as provide support and encouragement.”


"Generations United is pleased to partner with LeadingAge to create this important resource," added Nancy Henkin, Ph.D., Senior Fellow, Generations United. “We are excited to see so much interest in intergenerational programming among senior housing providers and hope this tool will help foster meaningful interaction between older residents and young people in their community."


Drs. Patterson and Henkin partnered with staff at 6 national affordable housing providers, all LeadingAge members, who functioned as a learning collaborative. Over a 12 month period, each participant received technical assistance from the research team as well as from other participants, on planning, implementing and evaluating their intergenerational programs. Some examples include:


  • Volunteers of America/Country View Multi-Family Apartments and Town Homes/Benton Harbor, MI: The resident service coordinator strove to create a sense of belonging for older and younger residents, and paths for building friendships and participating in social engagements; for kids, the coordinator aimed to provide a sense of community and opportunities to assume leadership roles. Activities include regular chess matches, technology education and games.
  • Lutheran Senior Services/Vernon Heights/Lebanon, MO: Aiming to increase residents’ sense of purpose and help to decrease isolation, the service coordinator aligned with Lebanon Area Homeschoolers’ Association. Residents and youth connect during the day to participate in games, such as balloon volleyball, and educational experiences aligned with the homeschooling curriculua.
  • HumanGood/Life’s Garden/Sunnyvale, CA: Life's Garden created a successful "teaching tech" program with two local high schools. They are now seeking to address residents' limited proficiency in English via a partnership with San Jose State focused on teaching English as a second language.

The next component of this project, now underway, involves webinars and in-person staff trainings at affordable housing organizations across the country, including HumanGood, Volunteers of America, the American Association of Service Coordinators and the American Society on Aging.


About the LeadingAge LTSSCenter @UMassBoston


The LeadingAge LTSS Center @UMass Boston conducts studies and evaluations that serve as a foundation for government and provider action to improve quality of care and quality of life for the most vulnerable older Americans. The LTSS Center, with offices in Washington, DC and Boston, MA, combines the resources of a major research university with the expertise and experience of applied researchers working with providers of long-term services and supports (LTSS). Established in 2017 by LeadingAge and the University of Massachusetts Boston, the LTSS Center builds on UMass Boston’s partnership with Community Catalyst, a national consumer health advocacy organization.


About Generations United


For three decades, Generations United has been the catalyst for policies and practices stimulating cooperation and collaboration among generations, evoking the vibrancy, energy and sheer productivity that result when people of all ages comes together. We believe that we can only be successful in the face of our complex future if generational diversity is regarded as a national asset and fully leveraged. The National Center on Grandfamilies is a critical part of Generations United's mission on strives to enact policies and promote programs that support relative caregivers and the children they raise. www.gu.org

Intro: 

Latest in LTSSCenter @UMassBoston and Generations United Collaboration Funded by Retirement Research Foundation

News Type: 
News Areas: 
Provider Type (If Any): 
Housing Plus Services
Senior Housing
Subsidized Housing
Author: 
Lisa Sanders
Members Only: 

Contact: Lisa Sanders

lsanders@leadingage.org / 202-507-3960

April 11, 2019, Washington D.C. -- A large and rapidly expanding population of low-income older adults in the U.S. faces the challenge of finding affordable, safe housing that can accommodate their changing needs, such as declining physical or cognitive health, as they age. Models using affordable senior housing as a platform for delivering health and supportive services have yielded promising, positive impact in helping older adults remain healthy and independent, improving their quality of life and reducing use of costly health care services. Yet a pressing and unresolved question remains: how can these housing-plus-services models be financed in a scalable and sustainable way?

New research from the LeadingAge LTSS Center @Mass Boston offers some possible solutions to creating feasible, sustainable housing-plus-services models. Over a 12 month period, LTSS Center staff researchers, joined by colleagues from the National Well Home Network, and the Harvard Medical School Department of Health Care Policy, reviewed potential financing options to support housing-plus-services models, by studying existing research and policies as well as interviewing subject-matter experts from key areas -- managed care and accountable care organizations, Medicare and Medicaid policy programs, federal and state health policy offices, health care providers as well as affordable housing providers. The center’s 35 page report, “Exploring Financing Options for Services in Affordable Senior Housing Communities,” is packed with insights for health providers, housing providers, and policy makers.

“The older adults population is rapidly expanding, with 10 million people turning 65 each day until 2030. Many will be low-income and have significant health challenges. We need to find effective ways for supporting these older adults to age in their community and minimize unnecessary use of costly health care services,” says Alisha Sanders, Director, Housing and Services Policy Research, LeadingAge LTSS Center @UMass Boston. “We know the value and impact of affordable housing with services for low-income older adults based on the results of multiple evaluations. This report will help policymakers and providers identify ways they can support spreading this proven model.”

Report overview:

Describes the housing plus services model considered in this exploration, and the benefits associated with this model, including lower hospital usage, lower Medicare expenditure growth, higher-value health care usage, success in reaching high-risk populations, and fewer nursing home transfers.

  • Defines criteria for considering potential financing sources.
  • Considers features of the housing plus services model that would be supported by financial sources.
  • Examines key issues that may bear on the feasibility of potential financing mechanisms for housing plus services models.
  • Discusses aspects of the Medicare and Medicaid programs that may facilitate or inhibit possible financial support of the model.
  • Presents and evaluates potential financing solutions that could make the housing plus services model feasible and sustainable.
  • An 8 page research snapshot provides an overview of the exploration and its findings.

About the LeadingAge LTSSCenter @UMassBoston

The LeadingAge LTSS Center @UMass Boston conducts studies and evaluations that serve as a foundation for government and provider action to improve quality of care and quality of life for the most vulnerable older Americans. The LTSS Center, with offices in Washington, DC and Boston, MA, combines the resources of a major research university with the expertise and experience of applied researchers working with providers of long-term services and supports (LTSS). Established in 2017 by LeadingAge and the University of Massachusetts Boston, the LTSS Center builds on UMass Boston’s partnership with Community Catalyst, a national consumer health advocacy organization.

 
Intro: 

LeadingAge LTSS Center @UMass Boston Provides Possible Solutions

News Type: 
News Areas: 
Provider Type (If Any): 
Housing Finance
Housing Plus Services
HUD
Author: 
Lisa Sanders
Members Only: 

Contact: Lisa Sanders

202-508-9407 / lsanders@leadingage.org

April 5, 2019 Washington D.C. -- LeadingAge today praises the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s announcing the competition for $50 million in funding for the Section 202 Supportive Housing for the Elderly program. This much-needed influx of monies will be used to create new housing connected to supportive services for low-income older adults and provide rent subsidies to help ensure affordability.

Created as part of the Housing Act of 1959, Section 202 housing provides nearly 400,000 quality homes for older adults nationwide. The announcement of funds Congress appropriated in fiscal years 2017 and 2018 is particularly impactful in light of the fact that Congress has not provided funding for new 202 housing since FY’10.

“With demand far exceeding the current supply, this financial support is incredibly welcome news,” said Katie Smith Sloan, LeadingAge president and CEO. “We’ve worked hard to raise awareness of the need to not only keep the Section 202 program alive, but to ensure that it thrives. We know that the affordable, quality housing this program makes possible is, in many cases, a life saver.”

Over the past year, LeadingAge, its members, and Section 202 residents made thousands of contacts with elected officials in support of additional resources for the Section 202 program. Hundreds of housing advocates and older adults who live in 202 housing participated in LeadingAge’s June 2017 SaveHUD202 rally in Washington D.C., sharing poignant stories to demonstrate the 202 program’s impact.

Need for low-income supportive housing for older adults has steadily increased since the 202 program’s last funding for new construction in FY10. Of the 582,000 household increase in worst-case housing needs HUD reported to Congress in 2017, 66 % were older adult households. A household is considered ‘worst case’ if their income is less than 50 % of the area median and they pay more than half of their income for rent.

“Refunding a program after years of drought is a rarity. We’re grateful for this positive change, which we interpret as a recognition of both its success and a response to tremendous need,” said Linda Couch, vice president of housing policy, LeadingAge. “We will continue to advocate on our members’ behalf.”

Dr. Laverne Joseph, president and CEO of LeadingAge member Retirement Housing Foundation, which operates 99 HUD 202 buildings, with 5,562 apartments, said, “We have 12,255 persons on our HUD 202 waiting lists. That’s two and a half times as many persons as we have apartments. With 10 thousand persons turning 65 every day in the U.S, and many of them with minimal savings or little or no pensions, demand is skyrocketing.”

Steve Protulis, president and CEO, Elderly Housing Development & Operations Corporation, said: “While greatly needed and appreciated, the level of funding is significantly less than the $582 million that had been nearly routinely funded annually for Section 202 new development in FY2010 and previous years. We hope that this action represents a reversal of recent year funding cuts that will continue in recognition of the critical need for affordable senior housing and its cost effectiveness linked with health and supportive services. These options allow seniors to age-in-place and avoid or delay more costly living settings. We must continue to have our voices heard. As so many of our older residents indicated at the June 2017 Save HUD 202 rally with their chants: “Long Overdue, Bring Back 202,” this program is of vital importance to older Americans.”

About LeadingAge

The mission of LeadingAge is to be the trusted voice for aging. Our 6,000+ members and partners include nonprofit organizations representing the entire field of aging services, 38 state associations, hundreds of businesses, consumer groups, foundations and research centers. LeadingAge is also part of the Global Ageing Network, whose membership spans 30 countries. LeadingAge is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt charitable organization focused on education, advocacy and applied research.
 

Intro: 

Department of Housing and Urban Development announces competition for $50 million for new construction 

 

News Type: 
News Areas: 
Provider Type (If Any): 
HUD
Author: 
Lisa Sanders
Members Only: 

Re: March 6, 2019 Senate Finance Committee Hearing, Not Forgotten: Protecting Americans from Abuse and Neglect in Nursing Homes

LeadingAge, the association of nonprofit providers of aging services, including skilled nursing, has long stood for quality nursing home care. We participated in the development of the Nursing Home Reform Act, enacted as part of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987 (OBRA ‘87). We have taken leadership roles in numerous care-improvement efforts, such as the creation and maintenance of dementia care programs. We were a leader in the development of what is now the National Partnership to Improve Dementia Care in Nursing Homes, a program now overseen by CMS.

Let me be clear: we do not excuse abuse and neglect. LeadingAge and its nonprofit members are committed to providing older adults with high-quality care and have long been a partner to CMS and policymakers in establishing best practices. Those who commit illegal acts must be punished and improper care will not be tolerated.

It must be noted that current laws and regulations address unacceptable situations, such as those described in today’s hearing.

That issues of abuse and neglect, along with poor quality care, continue, causes us to ask how all of us might work together to reduce incidents such as these. In the 32 years since OBRA ‘87 was enacted, LeadingAge and its members have joined with CMS and other stakeholders on initiatives like the elimination of restraints and the reduction of the inappropriate use of antipsychotic drugs which have had measurable success in improving the quality of care in nursing homes, even as more work can be done.

Nursing homes must comply with an extensive set of regulations. Will more of them yield better care? Or, should we all question whether the approach established as part of OBRA over 30 years ago is relevant and sufficient to meet the needs older adults and providers today? We believe it is time to forge a new path forward: one of close collaboration between providers, policymakers, regulators, and consumers that will better help providers meet the challenges faced to achieve the type of care older adults need as they age.

Nursing homes play a critical role in our healthcare system and will continue to do so. This is not an us versus them situation. We—providers, policymakers, consumers and elected officials—are all in this together. We ask for an honest conversation about how all providers— and rural ones in particular—can attract and retain the staff they need; the need for a clear assessment about the true costs of care; and how the nursing home oversight system can effectively promote systemic organizational change leading to measurable and sustained quality improvement within nursing homes.

We owe it to older adults and those who care for them to figure this out.”

Intro: 

President and CEO Katie Smith Sloan responds to "Not Forgotten: Protecting Americans from Abuse and Neglect in Nursing Homes" 

News Type: 
Provider Type (If Any): 
Nursing Home Payment and Finance
Nursing Home Quality
Nursing Home Rules and Regulation
Nursing Homes
Author: 
Lisa Sanders
Members Only: 

Contact: Lisa Sanders/LeadingAge
lsanders@leadingage.org; 202-508-9407
Contact: AHCAPressOffice@ahca.org
202-898-2814


February 15, 2019 Washington D.C. -- LeadingAge and the American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living applaud today’s introduction of the bi-partisan Nursing Home Workforce Quality Act. Leaders of both organizations, which combined represent the majority of America’s skilled nursing and long-term care providers, praise Rep. Sean Duffy (R-WI) and Collin Peterson (D-MN) for their leadership on a long-overdue initiative that will support nursing homes’ efforts to train staff and provide the highest quality of care to older adults.


The legislation introduced today modifies the Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) training lock-out mandated by the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987 (OBRA). It eliminates the statute’s rigid provisions and grants CMS greater flexibility in reinstating providers’ valuable CNA training programs.


“Nursing homes and other long-term care providers are grappling with a severe workforce shortage. The ability to train CNAs is crucial to building and maintaining a pipeline of qualified staff,” said LeadingAge president and CEO Katie Smith Sloan. “We have advocated for this change to OBRA for many years. The introduction of this bill is a monumental step forward in our ongoing efforts to address the challenges providers face in recruiting and retaining workers.”


Under current law, nursing homes assessed civil monetary penalties above a certain level on their annual survey automatically lose their authority to train staff to be CNAs for two years. The suspension is required even if the fines are unrelated to the quality of care given to residents or if the care deficiencies cited on the survey are unrelated to the nursing home’s CNA training program. CNAs, who provide direct care to residents, are critical members of every nursing home’s care team.


“Effectively eliminating training programs for vital front-line staff threatens the quality of care we provide, particularly as the shortage of health care workers becomes more acute,” said Mark Parkinson, president and CEO of the American Health Care Association/National Center for Assisted Living. “CNAs are the backbone of quality care and the jobs that nursing homes and assisted living communities provide are often integral to the community, particularly in rural and small communities where they are the major employer in the area. This bill will help everyone be more responsive to the needs of residents and providers.”


Both LeadingAge and AHCA/NCAL appreciate the leadership Reps. Duffy and Peterson have shown on this issue, and urge their House colleagues to join them in cosponsoring this important legislation.


About LeadingAge


The mission of LeadingAge is to be the trusted voice of aging. Our 6,000+ members and partners include nonprofit organizations representing the entire field of aging services, 38 state associations, hundreds of businesses, consumer groups, foundations and research centers. LeadingAge is also part of the Global Ageing Network, whose membership spans 30 countries. LeadingAge is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt charitable organization focused on education, advocacy and applied research.


About AHCA/NCAL


The American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living (AHCA/NCAL) represents more than 13,500 nonprofit and proprietary skilled nursing centers, assisted living communities, sub-acute care centers and homes for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. By delivering solutions for quality care, AHCA/NCAL aims to improve the lives of frail, elderly and individuals with disabilities who receive long term or post-acute care in our member facilities each day. For more information, please visit www.ahca.org or www.ncal.org.

Intro: 

Leading Industry Groups Support Legislation to End Mandatory CNA Training Lock-Outs

News Type: 
Provider Type (If Any): 
Nursing Home Quality
Nursing Home Rules and Regulation
Nursing Homes
Author: 
Lisa Sanders
Members Only: 

Contact: Lisa Sanders

lsanders@leadingage / 202-508-9407

Roseanne Zabka

rzabka@hhcsinc.com / 201-405-0075, ext. 11

Oakland NJ and Washington DC, February 2019 -- Resident Assistants (RAs) in Assisted Living Facilities (ALFs) showed a 4.05% increase in hourly rates in 2018, according to the 21st annual Assisted Living Salary & Benefits Report, recently published by the Hospital & Healthcare Compensation Service (HCS). The report is published in cooperation with LeadingAge and supported by the National Center for Assisted Living (NCAL).

This year’s number was an increase over the 2017 increase of 3.10%. (Figures represent the increase in RA pay from communities that participated in both the 2017 and 2018 studies.) RAs at larger communities received higher pay than their smaller counterparts. The national average hourly rate for RAs in ALFs with up to 89 beds was $11.46, compared to $12.88 in ALFs with 90+ beds. The national combined hourly rate was $11.74.

In a comparison of 2018 RA actual percent increases by facility type, ALFs reported the highest increases, followed by CCRCs with an increase of 3.21%, and nursing home increases of 2.70%. Turnover for RAs increased from 33.00% in 2017 to 36.23 in 2018.

Data analysis by state showed that RAs in Mississippi received the lowest average pay of $9.33, while Massachusetts RAs received the highest average pay of $14.31. The national average hourly rate for RAs was $11.74.

The Assisted Living Salary & Benefits Report covers 20 management and 29 non-management positions. 1,250+ Assisted Living communities participated in the study. The 250-page Report includes data from ALFs, PCFs, and RCFs. Data are reported according to for-profit and not-for-profit status, revenue size, unit-size, state, county and geographic region. Also covered are 18 fringe benefits, turnover rates by department, and projected salary increases for 2019. Data are effective as of October 2018. The discounted price for LeadingAge members is $275 versus the $350 non-member rate.

Members of the media who would like a press copy: please email Lisa Sanders at LeadingAge: lsanders@leadingage.org

About LeadingAgeThe mission of LeadingAge is to be the trusted voice for aging. Our 6,000+ members and partners include nonprofit organizations representing the entire field of aging services, 38 state associations, hundreds of businesses, consumer groups, foundations and research centers. LeadingAge is also a part of the Global Ageing Network, whose membership spans 30 countries. LeadingAge is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt charitable organization focused on education, advocacy and applied research.

About Hospital & Healthcare Compensation Service

Since 1971, HCS has served the healthcare industry by conducting and publishing an array of comprehensive, reliable compensation reports. HSC currently publishes ten different reports on an annual basis. In addition, the firm conducts custom marketplace studies to support its clients. Please visit www.hhcsinc.com for more information.

Intro: 

Report Covers 20 Management and 29 Non-management Positions

ALF Residents Show 4.05% Hourly Rate Increase in 2018

News Type: 
Provider Type (If Any): 
Assisted Living
Author: 
Lisa Sanders
Members Only: 

We are glad Congress and the President have reached agreement on a measure to end the partial shutdown and reopen affected federal agencies for three weeks. It is good news, of course, for so many people across the country, said LeadingAge president and CEO Katie Smith Sloan. 

For LeadingAge members who provide government subsidized, affordable housing for low-income older adults -- providers like Alma Ballard, executive director of the Family Housing Management Co. – this is particularly welcome relief.

Ms. Ballard is one of many among our members who because of the shutdown had to tap reserves after HUD said it would not renew contracts expiring in December.

That raised concerns for Diana Siarto, a 70-year old former waitress and retired Las Vegas pit boss who lives in an apartment operated by Family Housing Management. As The Washington Post reported, she, and thousands of other low income older adults around the country, depend on the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)-funded programs: “We’ve worked all our lives. We’re all low-income. We have no place else to go. We’re literally out on the streets if these places shut down.”

LeadingAge is concerned that the comfort brought by this interim deal to reopen the government may not be long lasting. Remember that about a month ago, when the possibility of another continuing resolution loomed large, HUD said then that the FY18 funding levels would not be sufficient to sustain 202/PRAC renewal costs, which rose significantly between FY18 and FY19, through January 2019.

A continuing resolution (CR) would provide only the amount of funding for 2019 that housing programs received last year; last year’s spending levels would not cover this year’s increased costs.

Our position: this has to be the last CR.

We urge HUD to get expired contracts renewed as soon as furloughed employees return to their desks, and ensure that those contracts due to expire in February 2019 are renewed before the 15th.

And, Congress: before the current three-week spending measure expires, pass a HUD spending bill covering the rest of this fiscal year in order to restore stability to programs that house older people who have no other resources.

Intro: 

While end of longest-ever federal government shutdown brings relief, LeadingAge's concerns and commitment to our funding objectives remain 

News Type: 
News Areas: 
Provider Type (If Any): 
HUD
Preservation
Senior Housing
Author: 
Lisa Sanders
Members Only: 

Contact: Lisa Sanders/LeadingAge

lsanders@leadingage.org; 202-508-9407

Contact: Katy Corey/TimeSlips

katy@filamentwi.com; 414-931-1269

January 15, 2019 Washington D.C. -- LeadingAge, the association of nonprofit providers of aging services, today announces a partnership with nonprofit TimeSlips, an international network of caregivers and artists committed to bringing meaningful engagement to older adults, people living with dementia, and those who care for them.

The collaboration enables TimeSlips with funds and expertise to expand its curriculum and audience. Over the next two years, TimeSlips will formalize and disseminate training programs for high-school and college students, with the goal of building the next generation of users. LeadingAge will invest $189,000 from the LeadingAge Innovation Fund over 2 years as well as serve as an advisor to TimeSlips in program development and execution.

“Our involvement with TimeSlips touches 3 of our core focus areas: workforce development, raising awareness of dementia and caregiving, and challenging ageism,” said Katie Smith Sloan, president and CEO of LeadingAge. “As we look at solutions for the many challenges our members face, we strive to partner with innovative, forward-thinking organizations like TimeSlips. This effort aligns closely with our wish for all older adults: access to high-quality, person-centered care that acknowledges and celebrates the value and worth of people at all stages of aging. We can’t wait to get started.”

Founded in 1998 by Anne Basting, a 2016 MacArthur Fellow, Milwaukee, WI-based TimeSlips helps people connect through creativity with training and certification in person-directed caregiving for all people, and particularly for people living with dementia. To date, the organization has certified caregiver facilitators in 46 states and 17 countries. The LeadingAge collaboration is aimed at helping TimeSlips scale its programming to a reach a national student audience. At the partnership’s completion, TimeSlips aims to establish credit bearing programs at 10 high schools and colleges in the U.S., with a plan to roll out materials nationally.

“For so many students, TimeSlips is a joyful first exposure to working with elders, one that can help shed negative stereotypes,” said Ms. Bastings, TimeSlips CEO. “To partner with a visionary group like LeadingAge gives us a chance to watch countless lives and relationships bloom.”

The partnership is structured in 2 phases. In the first year, TimeSlips will create a stakeholder group comprised of executives, educators, and LeadingAge state partners and provider members. The nonprofit will also develop support materials, curriculum, and evaluation tools as well as test and evaluate programming at select campuses. The following year will focus on distribution and implementation of volunteer, student service learning, Student Artist-in-Residence and credit-bearing training programs at a minimum of 10 campuses, followed by an evaluation.

About LeadingAge

The mission of LeadingAge is to be the trusted voice for aging. Our 6,000+ members and partners include nonprofit organizations representing the entire field of aging services, 38 state associations, hundreds of businesses, consumer groups, foundations and research centers. LeadingAge is also a part of the Global Ageing Network, whose membership spans 30 countries. LeadingAge is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt charitable organization focused on education, advocacy and applied research.

About TimeSlips

TimesSlips is an award-winning, international nonprofit that brings meaning and purpose to late life by inspiring a dynamic of respect and wonder between older people and those who care for them. Founded by MacArthur “Genius” Fellow Anne Basting, TimeSlips provides inspiring tools and resources to spark creative engagement regardless of physical or cognitive disabilities. We work toward a moment when creative engagement is simply standard practice in our care relationships.

 
Intro: 

Agreement Will Aid TimeSlips' Expansion with LeadingAge as Advisor and Investor

News Type: 
Author: 
Lisa Sanders
Members Only: 

Launched a New Research Website


In December, the LeadingAge LTSS Center @UMass Boston unveiled its new website: www.LTSScenter.org. The new website represents an important milestone in the development of the LTSS Center, which was established in 2017 by LeadingAge and the Gerontology Institute at the University of Massachusetts Boston.


LTSScenter.org showcases the LTSS Center’s work while offering visitors a comprehensive repository of academic and applied research that bridges policy and practice in the field of aging. We hope you’ll visit LTSScenter.org often to read about the latest research in our field.


Celebrated Research Milestones


While reveling in the launch of its new website, the LTSS Center also celebrated 2018 as a year of many accomplishments, including the publication of significant research findings that:


Helped Prepare Members for the Government Shutdown


In late December, LeadingAge was looking out for housing members that would be affected by the looming government shutdown.


In advance of the shutdown, LeadingAge urged Congress to enact a final FY19 appropriations bill before expiration of the Continuing Resolution funding the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and several other federal agencies. At the same time, we kept LeadingAge housing members informed about how the shutdown, which began on Dec. 21, would affect HUD and its programs.


Commented on Important Issues


LeadingAge and its content experts lent their voices to several important issues in December:


Caregiver Benefits: LeadingAge responded to a request for comments on how to implement 2 changes to the Veterans Affairs (VA) Family Caregivers program. Those changes, which were authorized by the VA MISSION Act of 2018, include adding a new pathway to eligibility to veterans who may need services, and offering new benefits for eligible families.


Value-Based Payments: Nicole Fallon, vice president of health policy and integrated services, spoke to a number of media outlets after the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services took steps to reduce avoidable hospital readmissions of nursing home residents by lowering payments to nearly 11,000 nursing homes, and giving bonuses to nearly 4,000 others. "Skilled facilities have been working toward this and knew it was coming," Fallon told Kaiser Health News. She also expressed concerns that nursing homes could continue to be penalized even after they had done all they could to prevent return trips to the hospital. "At what point have we achieved all we can achieve?" Fallon asked.


Affordable Senior Housing: Linda Couch, vice president of housing policy, spoke to a number of media outlets after the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University released a report on affordable housing for low-income older adults. In December, Couch told Senior Housing News that she’d like to see a 50% increase in states’ Low Income Housing Tax Credit allocations, as well as changes that would allow subsidizing of lower income households than the program currently supports. “There has been legislation introduced we hope to move further along in the next Congress,” Couch said. Couch also discussed the Harvard report with McKnight’s Senior Living and Reuters.


Life Plan Communities: Steve Maag, director of residential communities, was quoted in a New York Times article exploring how baby boomers are creating a surge in luxury care communities. “Baby boomers are being a very demanding customer,” said Maag, adding that the senior living field must respond “to a consumer that has pushed back on everything they’ve touched in the last 60 years.”


Led the Fight Against Ageism


From Dec. 10 through Dec. 14, LeadingAge dedicated its social media platforms to educating Americans about ageism. The week-long #WhatIsAgeism campaign was designed to spark conversations that shared information and stories about ageism, raised awareness about how to spot and address ageism, and started discussions among family and friends about how ageism affects us all. The campaign’s results were impressive. For example, a total of 189 #WhatIsAgeism messages on Twitter had a potential reach of 166,000 Twitter users over the course of the week.


Launched New Education Programs


LeadingAge members engaged with our education team during 2 virtual programs presented through our Learning Hub in December.


A webinar on Dec. 12 explored the legal and operational challenges raised by the recreational and medical use of marijuana by residents and employees of LeadingAge member communities.


Our first Virtual Federal Update on Dec. 17 reviewed LeadingAge’s policy successes over the past year, the outlook for the new Congress, and policy areas of most concern to LeadingAge communities.


The education team also spent December preparing for its 2019 Leadership Educator Program, which will teach a small group of LeadingAge members how to design and deliver learning opportunities in settings that range from stand-up meetings and mentoring sessions to trainings, board retreats, and strategic planning forums. The Leadership Educator Program takes place May through August, both in-person and virtually. Applications are due Feb. 4.

Intro: 

Here’s an overview of our work for you in December 2018.

News Type: 
News Areas: 
News Topics: 
Provider Type (If Any): 
CFAR
Housing Plus Services
Life Plan Community (CCRC)
Nursing Home Payment and Finance
Nursing Homes
Senior Housing
Subsidized Housing
Author: 
Geralyn Magan
Members Only: 

LeadingAge Statement from president and CEO Katie Smith Sloan in response to "Sheltering in Danger," an investigative report by the Minority Staff of the U.S. Senate Committee on Finance," Nov. 2, 2018.

We appreciate that the Finance Committee is interested in ensuring that nursing home residents are safe and receive high-quality care. Our members, nonprofit providers of aging services, including skilled nursing, share these concerns and live them every day.

As we said in written testimony to the Committee in September, the deaths at Hollywood Hills should never have happened. Had outside witnesses been invited to testify in early September, LeadingAge would have pointed out that the new CMS emergency preparedness rules outline very detailed specifications for emergency plans that address all potential hazards.

First, let’s be clear. We make no apology for poor quality nursing home care. Errors should be addressed. Continual improvement is a must. That’s why LeadingAge has supported the substantial changes, put into place in late 2017 as part of CMS’ new regulations, months after the Florida and Texas events described in this Nov. 2018 “Sheltering in Danger,” report.

Regarding the Committee’s recommendations, we propose that, prior to adding more regulations -- and risk complicating the decision process administrators and nursing home staff follow when assessing whether to stay or go -- the Committee members speak to administrators and staff whose deep experience in managing disaster situations has yielded success. As the report introduction notes, ‘most of the facilities weathered [hurricane Harvey and Irma] without incident…’

We believe that while clear requirements are essential, room must be allowed for human judgment in emergency and disaster situations.

Nobody entrusted with making the decision to evacuate or shelter in place takes it lightly. As we’ve seen, lives depend on leaders making the right decision - and learning from what happened before. Fortunately, emergency plans and generators were in place to deal effectively with Hurricanes Florence and Michael, both of which occurred after the new rules went into effect.

Let’s give the new system a chance to work. Further, we suggest that all community partners be part of the solution. For example, nursing homes should be as high as hospitals on the priority list for restoration of power.

In the spirit of continual improvement, we encourage the Committee to adopt a ‘learn-from-the-best’ mentality. Improve training and preparation, as suggested, and develop a better-informed, receptive and responsive community emergency response system. Draw from the examples of experienced operators, including those who during the recent Hurricane Florence and Michael disasters, demonstrated their ability to properly assess options and manage the situation while working within existing guidelines. (See NPR.org: “How Nursing Homes are Preparing for Hurricane Florence,” Sept. 11, 2018, and NBCNews.com: “Evacuate or Stay? For Nursing Homes in Storm’s Path, the Decision isn’t Easy,” Sept. 12, 2018)

We would welcome the opportunity to convene providers, CMS, consumers and other stakeholders to meet with the Committee staff to discuss emergency and disaster planning and the experiences of our members with planning and with the new requirements. If the Committee determines that additional requirements are necessary, we respectfully suggest committing new resources to support implementation and evaluate impact.

Finally, all of the nearly 6,000 provider communities that belong to LeadingAge care deeply about supporting each other when disaster strikes. We established the LeadingAge Disaster Relief Fund in 2017. Last year, thanks to more than 1,000 donations from member organizations and people around the country, we raised more than $680,000 to help those affected by hurricanes, mudslides, and wildfires. This year members contributed nearly $20,000 to help those affected by Hurricane Florence. All Funds go directly to those in need for basics like food and water.

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News Type: 
Provider Type (If Any): 
Nursing Home Quality
Nursing Home Rules and Regulation
Nursing Homes
Author: 
Lisa Sanders
Members Only: 

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