Nutrition, FMAP and More in Coronavirus-2

Members | March 19, 2020 | by Marsha R. Greenfield

The “Families First Coronavirus Response Act”, which was signed into law by the President on March 18, contained a number of provisions in addition to paid sick and FMLA leave, described in LeadingAge’s article, President Signs Families First Coronavirus Response Act; What Does This Mean for Aging Services?

The “Families First Coronavirus Response Act”, which was signed into law by the President on March 18, contained a number of provisions in addition to paid sick and FMLA leave, described in LeadingAge’s article, President Signs Families First Coronavirus Response Act; What Does This Mean for Aging Services?

FMAP: As is often the case in emergencies, the Federal Medical Assistance Percentage determined for each. state and territory is increased to meet increased need. The bill increases FMAP by 6.2% during the public emergency declaration relating to coronavirus. As is also usual, the states are not allowed to make changes to their Medicaid program that would be more restrictive than the eligibility standards, methodologies, or procedures in effect as of January 1, 2020 (Maintenance of Effort).

Aging and Disability Programs: The budget for the Administration on Community Living is increased by $250 Million, with $160 Million for home delivered nutrition services, $80 Million for Congregate Nutrition Services, and $10 Million for Native Americans.

Free testing: The bill requires testing for COVID-19 to be free, whether the individual is covered by private insurance, Medicare, or Medicaid or has no insurance. No co-pays, cost sharing, etc., and authorizes $1B to cover testing where the individual is not insured.

SNAP waivers: Some of the eligibility requirements for SNAP benefits for jobless adults is waived and states can request emergency allotments.

As we have noted, and literally as we are publishing this article, the Senate is developing its third bill to respond to the economic, health, and social crisis arising out of this crisis. We are regularly communicating with key congressional offices the needs of the non-profit aging services community we represent.