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If you are a member of the media and would like to connect with one of our aging subject matter experts, please contact Lisa Sanders at lsanders@leadingage.org.

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  1. August 15: Next SNF QRP Reporting Compliance Period

    As a reminder, all SNFs have until 11:59 p.m. PST on August 15 to submit and correct any MDS assessments for first quarter (January 1 – March 31) 2018 data. This data will be used in determining compliance with the 2% penalty applying to FY2020 rates and be used to determine the SNFs performance on ...

  2. 2 Ways to Make Assisted Living More Affordable

    When Benchmark Senior Living opened a new community in North Attleboro, MA., it found a way to lower costs by rethinking space and the way residents live. Tom Grape, the organization’s founder and chief executive, talked recently with Len Fishman, director of the Gerontology Institute at the University of Massachusetts Boston. The Gerontology Institute is a partner in the LeadingAge LTSS Center @UMass Boston.

  3. How to Share Campus Space for the Good of Young and Old

    Dr. Taryn Patterson, a research associate with the LeadingAge LTSS Center @UMass Boston, thinks LeadingAge members have the potential to bring intergenerational programming to scale nationwide. A new report from Generations United suggests that some members are already working toward that goal.

  4. OSHA Proposes to Limit Information to be Reported Electronically by Certain Employers

    Background: OSHA regulations require employers to collect a variety of information on occupational injuries and illnesses. Employers with more than 10 employees in most industries must keep those records at their establishments and must record each recordable employee injury and illness on an OSHA Form 300, the “Log of ...

  5. Stop the Hysteria about Dementia

    The firehose of news we receive each day about the predictors of dementia sends some pretty dangerous messages to the average consumer, writes Kirsten Jacobs.