Online Databases: Where's the Rental Assistance Help?

Legislation | November 03, 2020 | by Linda Couch

Two online databases of COVID-19-related state- and local-rental assistance programs may help: 1) aging services providers to help renters (and, often, homeowners) retain stable housing, and 2) help affordable senior housing owners receive relief for rental income shortfall experienced as renters declare eligibility for the CDC’s eviction moratorium for nonpayment of rent.

Two online databases of COVID-19-related state- and local-rental assistance programs may help: 1) aging services providers to help renters (and, often, homeowners) retain stable housing, and 2) help affordable senior housing owners receive relief for rental income shortfall experienced as renters declare eligibility for the CDC’s eviction moratorium for nonpayment of rent.

The CDC’s eviction moratorium for nonpayment of rent is in effect through December 31. Any renters who declare eligibility for the moratorium, by signing an eviction moratorium declaration (the one provided by the CDC or others), will be liable for any unpaid rent or penalty fees accumulated during the moratorium. These arrearages will no doubt take their toll on tenants come January 1, when they start to come due.

Landlords are also feeling the pain, having not received rent payments from tenants who’ve declared themselves eligible for the moratorium and stopped paying rent.

State and local governments, using mostly funds derived from March’s CARES Act, have set up a multitude of housing assistance programs. Some are for renters, some are for homeowners, some are for landlords, and some are for a combination of these.

A database of state and local rental assistance programs, compiled by the National Housing Law Project and the National Low Income Housing Coalition, is here.

Another, from the National Council of State Housing Agencies, is here.

LeadingAge is urging Congress, as part of any next COVID-19 relief package, to include rental assistance to help renters, owners, and landlords survive the pandemic’s impact.